Human rights activist, Aisha Yesufu, says she was the one who asked her husband, Aliu, out before they got along and eventually married.

Human rights activist, Aisha Yesufu, says she was the one who asked her husband, Aliu, out before they got along and eventually married.

Human rights activist, Aisha Yesufu, says she was the one who asked her husband, Aliu, out before they got along and eventually married.

She disclosed this in an interview with BBC Pidgin while reflecting on her growing up, marriage as well as her personality.

Aisha said her penchant for being in control of happenings around her made it easy for her to initiate the relationship.

She said: “The way I met my husband is a long story.

“I was the one who asked him out.

“I arranged it so he can see me as a wife since he wasn’t seeing me as a wife.

“He would tell you I don’t behave like a wife.”

The co-convener of the Bring Back Our Girls campaign urged women to ditch the mentality that men should always be the ones to initiate a relationship.

Yesufu said: “It amuses me when l see women approaching 30 or 40 years old claiming they don’t have any man asking them out.

“They should go out and look for men of their choice, initiate the relationship and marry them.

“One advice l would give to young women is that they should stop waiting for men to come and propose to them.

“They too can do the same.”

The activist also revealed that she’s always ready to satisfy her husband’s sexual fantasies, citing the night of their wedding as an instance.

She said: “One thing my husband would always say is that no time he comes that I tell him no.

“You know I am an Edo woman, we have to do it.

“On our wedding night, I told my husband that anyhow you want it, ask me.

“Any fantasy you have, I am available because that is my primary job.

“I do not delegate it.

“Every other thing I delegate but for that one work, I do not joke about it.”

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