Controversial Nigeiran rapper and one of the founding pillars of today’s Nigeria hip-hop industry, Eedris Abdulkareem, is proud of what young Nigerian act have turned the once despise Nigerian music industry into.

Controversial Nigeiran rapper and one of the founding pillars of today’s Nigeria hip-hop industry, Eedris Abdulkareem, is proud of what young Nigerian act have turned the once despise Nigerian music industry into.

Controversial Nigeiran rapper and one of the founding pillars of today’s Nigeria hip-hop industry, Eedris Abdulkareem, is proud of what young Nigerian act have turned the once despise Nigerian music industry into.

 

Speaking recently in Lagos the veteran rapper said he was proud of the new generation acts but frowned at the habit of baby mamas to the point of telling act who have baby mamas that they will regret it in future “my advice to him and others artistes is that don’t go to America and come back to show us cocaine in your videos which makes no sense.

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Another thing is having several babymamas because they will all regret it when they grow up. Don’t let you kids kill themselves because of jealousy.”

Born Eedris Turayo Abdulkareem Ajenifuja was born in to a polygamous family in Kano, Nigeria. His father was from Ilesha, Osun State, and his mother was from Ogun State. Raised in Kano, he adopted Kano State as his state of origin. He lost his father when he was 2 and 8 of his brothers.

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Abdulkareem performed with hip-hop band The Remedies from 1997 until they split in 2002. He continued as a solo artist and released the album P.A.S.S. ("Pains And Stress = Success") in 2002.

Its track "Wackawickee MC's" criticized Tony Tetuila, Plantashun Boiz and Double X Posse. Later in the same year he released an album titled Mr. Lecturer. Its title track “thematised “students in Nigerian colleges and universities receiving higher grades in exchange for money and sex.

In 2004 Abdulkareem released his third album” Jaga Jaga”, a Yoruba term for a shambles, declaiming corruption and suffering in Nigeria. The title track was banned from radio by President Olusegun Obasanjo, but continued to be played in nightclubs.The album cover was by artist Lemi Ghariokwu, known for creating many album covers for Fela Kuti.

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